Science that
helps you do you

Fertility tools and support—bundled up for you.

  • Test your fertility hormones
  • Get customized, physician-reviewed reports
  • Learn what your hormone levels mean for menopause onset, egg freezing and IVF, and conditions like POI or PCOS (we’ll dig into those later)
  • Join our weekly webinar (i.e. “Egginar”)
  • Get a free 1:1 consult with a fertility nurse
Order your test

Before we dive in

Women ask us all the time, “Will this test tell me I’m infertile?” and we want to make sure you know that the answer is no.

There is no absolute predictor of fertility.

Your hormones are not a crystal ball but they can help you understand your reproductive #career. They can indicate early menopause, health conditions like POI and PCOS, and get you data to think through egg freezing or IVF (fertility treatments are not right for everyone!). Keeping track of hormones over time helps you know where you are and get ahead of discussions with your doctor or partner, financial decisions, or treatment plans that could otherwise come out of nowhere.

Read More

So, what exactly can a fertility hormone test tell you?

We're so glad you asked

Modern Fertility can tell you if you have more or fewer eggs than average.

Fertility 101 We’re born with all the eggs we’ll ever have and they tick down to zero by the time we hit menopause. As we get older, those eggs naturally become more abnormal. AMH, FSH, and E2 are hormones that are involved in measuring egg quantity—or ovarian reserve.

So what? If you know you have fewer eggs than average for your age (and those eggs decrease in quality) then you can take steps to adjust. Information is power—it can help you maximize your chances by adjusting your timeline, looking into fertility treatments, or having an informed convo with your doctor about your options. We’ll include a doctor discussion guide to get you started.

Modern Fertility can tell you if you may hit menopause earlier or later than average.

Fertility 101 Every woman has a different fertility curve—just like she has a different metabolism. Knowing where menopause falls for you, can help you work backwards. The average age of menopause in the US is 51 and the process of menopause actually begins 10 years before you have your last period (it’s a funky window called perimenopause).

So what? If you know you might hit menopause earlier than average, you can plan ahead. Say you want to have three kids but don’t want to start until your late 30s. If you find out that you may start the process of perimenopause (when your chances of getting pregnant significantly decline) as early as your late 30s, you can adjust while you still have time to plan.

Modern Fertility can help you understand egg freezing or IVF outcomes.

Fertility 101 Doctors use ovarian reserve hormone testing (specifically AMH, FSH, and E2) to determine success rates for egg freezing and IVF.

So what? If you have a higher ovarian reserve than average and you’re not ready to have kids for awhile, you can chat with your doctor about your ideal timing. If it makes sense personally and financially, you could also consider egg freezing. We can help you dig in here—egg freezing can give you options but it is not the best personal or financial decision for everyone.

Modern Fertility explains how your general health relates to your hormones.

Fertility 101 Fertility is complicated—involving many parts of your body that we can measure with hormones. TSH, for example, measures thyroid health—key for developing and sustaining pregnancy. PRL helps with milk production during pregnancy but too much PRL can signal that there’s a problem, and T, or Testosterone, (yes women also have T:) also plays an important role. We walk you through all of this in your reports.

So what? If your thyroid levels are off or your luteinizing hormone is out of balance, they can get in the way of conceiving now or later. Fertility health is general body health and it’s important to know where you are so you can plan ahead!

Modern Fertility can help you understand PCOS.

Fertility 101 PCOS is a hormone condition that affects your body’s ability to release an egg every month. 1 in 10 women have this condition and it’s sometimes marked by weight gain and facial hair.

So what? Two hormones we test, AMH and T can play a role in detecting PCOS. Although they cannot diagnose the issue, it can help doctors understand if you may be at risk. A very high AMH can be a signal of PCOS. If you know you have this early, you can take proactive steps with your doctor to balance your hormones and create a plan— If and when you decide you want to get pregnant. Read more about the latest research around a PCOS cure here.

Modern Fertility can help you check general body factors, like thyroid, that can affect fertility.

Fertility 101 Thyroid disorders can affect the ability to have a healthy pregnancy for both mother and child. If your thyroid produces too many or too few hormones, it can impact a lot of things—whether or not you ovulate regularly, your mood, skin, weight, even how tired or hungry you feel.

Hypothyroidism is associated with increased risks of early pregnancy loss, hypertension and preterm delivery. It’s also associated with low birth weight babies and lower child IQ. It’s important to know your thyroid levels before you get pregnant so you can minimize risk.

Hyperthyroidism should be diagnosed and treated to make sure your thyroid is stable before you attempt to conceive. This minimizes the risk to mother and baby, and allows you to discuss with your doctor appropriate thyroid treatment during pregnancy.

So what? If you’re diagnosed with hypothyroidism, it’s important to talk to a doctor who can help balance things out. She or he may recommend hormone treatment or diet adjustments.

What you get
with Modern Fertility

We’re your team—and as we build a service for you, our friends, our sisters, and ourselves, we’re here to answer any questions you have, talk through anything that's on your mind, and get you the answers and support you need. We can't wait to meet you.

A customized test

On birth control? No problem. Your test will be customized for you and will include AMH, the most reliable marker for ovarian reserve.

Levels for your doctor

Download your levels and a discussion guide to start a conversation with your doctor.

Personalized reports

Your reports explain how your hormones relate to ovarian reserve, egg freezing and IVF, menopause, and more.

Support, always

Choose a 1:1 consultation with a fertility nurse or join a weekly “Egginar” to get answers.

A place to connect

Get access to a community of Modern women—we’re always here to get your questions answered!

What you get
with Modern Fertility

We’re your team—and as we build a service for you, our friends, our sisters, and ourselves, we’re here to answer any questions you have, talk through anything that's on your mind, and get you the answers and support you need. We can't wait to meet you.

A customized test

On birth control? No problem. Your test will be customized for you and will include AMH, the most reliable marker for ovarian reserve.

Levels for your doctor

Download your levels and a discussion guide to start a conversation with your doctor.

Personalized reports

Your reports explain how your hormones relate to ovarian reserve, egg freezing and IVF, menopause, and more.

Support, always

Choose a 1:1 consultation with a fertility nurse or join a weekly “Egginar” to get answers.

A place to connect

Get access to a community of Modern women—we’re always here to get your questions answered!

Hello, hormones

Hormones can help us team up with our doctors to understand egg count, ovulation, general body factors, and red flags that relate to fertility. The hormones we can test depend on the birth control we're on. Let’s tap into the things we can learn from our hormones.

Anti-mullerian hormone

AMH is produced by your follicles. The more AMH they produce, the more eggs you likely have.

Follicle stimulating hormone

FSH is responsible for growing follicles and starting ovulation. Too much FSH can mean your body needs extra oomph to get things moving.

Estradiol

E2 is a sex hormone produced by the ovaries. We test Estradiol along with FSH because it can impact FSH levels.

Luteinizing hormone

LH helps regulate your menstrual cycle.

Thyroid-stimulating hormone

TSH is produced by your thyroid gland and regulates thyroid health.

Free thyroxine

Also produced by your thyroid gland, we test FT4 to get the full picture of thyroid function as is relates to fertility.

Prolactin

PRL stimulates milk production and pauses ovulation after you give birth.

Testosterone

Testosterone is a steroid hormone that both men and women produce.

  • Anti-mullerian hormone
  • Follicle stimulating hormone
  • Estradiol
  • Luteinizing hormone
  • Thyroid-stimulating hormone
  • Free thyroxine
  • Prolactin
  • Testosterone

The science behind easier testing

If you choose to take the test at home, you’ll do a simple finger prick. Finger prick testing has been around since the 1960s—it just hasn’t been widely applied to fertility hormone testing (until now 💪). We ran a clinical study that showed that the Modern Fertility test (which you take at home) gets you the same results as a traditional blood draw.

See the study

If you’d rather go the blood draw route, that’s fine! You can choose to test at Quest diagnostics.

Meet some of our
medical advisors

Nataki Douglas, M.D.

Chair of the Modern Fertility Medical Advisory Board

Dr. Douglas received both her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas was at Columbia University for over 15 years and recently joined Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School as Director of Translational Research for the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health. Her research focuses on understanding how the reproductive system develops and what is required for successful embryo implantation and pregnancy. She has a long-standing interest in the practical applications of ovarian reserve testing with reproductive hormones, such as AMH and is nationally known for her work in the field of Reproductive Biology. She has been awarded grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Institutes of Health to support her research.

Julie Lamb

Julie Lamb, MD, FACOG is a board certified reproductive endocrinologist and infertility specialist at Pacific NW Fertility in Seattle and serves as clinical faculty at the University of Washington. Dr. Lamb graduated at the top of her class in biology and psychology from Seattle Pacific University, and completed her training in medical school at Northwestern University Fienberg School of Medicine in Chicago. She awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study international women’s health in Zimbabwe. Dr. Lamb completed her residency in Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Washington in Seattle, and did her fellowship in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at University of California, San Francisco. As clinical faculty at the University of Washington she directs the REI training of Ob/Gyn resident physicians and is the Director of the Center for Fertility Preservation at Pacific NW Fertility.

Robert Luo, M.D.

Medical Director

Dr. Robert Luo, MD, MPH is a board-certified pathologist who has worked on diagnostics over the last 15 years across academia, industry, and public health. Dr. Luo received his BA from Harvard University and his MD and MPH from Johns Hopkins University, before completing his residency training in anatomic and clinical pathology at Stanford University. He has worked at the US Centers for Disease Control, Stanford Medical Center, and most recently at Roche, where he served as a medical director for over 10 new diagnostic assays. His diagnostics work and public health has been published in JAMA, Lancet, and numerous other scientific journals.

Sajo Beqaj, PhD

Dr. Sajo Beqaj is board certified in molecular diagnostics and licensed as a Bioanalyst and High Complexity Laboratory Director. He has been practicing as a laboratory director for 13 years. He received his PhD in pathology from Wayne State University Medical School and performed his post-doctoral fellowship at Abbott Laboratories. He continued his career as a Research Assistant Professor at Children’s Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University.

Amber Worthington, PhD

Dr. Amber Worthington is a postdoctoral fellow in Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State. Her research focuses on health communication with a focus on message design and information sharing. Dr. Worthington also teaches research methods and communication theory at Penn State.

A number you can
track over time

When you take the test, you'll get a custom fertility report and a number on the Fertility Measurement Index (beta).

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

The FEMIbeta is a tool you can use to track fertility over time. Every year, you’ll get a FEMIbeta number that ranges from 150 to 750. It’s comprised of three main factors: Age, hormone level(s), and health information from your survey—like BMI and smoking habits.

You’re in good hands

Physician ordered
and reviewed

Every Modern Fertility test is reviewed by a board certified physician.

CLIA accredited laboratory

All tests are conducted in a CLIA and CAP Certified lab.

Developed by experts

Our team of physicians and clinical advisors lead the nation's top fertility clinics.

Let's do this thing

Order your test