Science that helps you do you

Get your hormones tested so you and your doctor can learn about:

  • The number of eggs you have
  • How your levels affect egg freezing or IVF
  • If you could hit menopause earlier or later than average
  • If you’re ovulating normally*
  • Red flags than can affect your fertile window

Hello hormones

Anti-mullerian hormone

AMH is produced by your follicles. The more AMH they produce, the more eggs you likely have.

Follicle stimulating hormone

FSH is responsible for growing follicles and starting ovulation. Too much FSH can mean your body needs extra oomph to get things moving.

Estradiol

E2 is a sex hormone produced by the ovaries. We test Estradiol along with FSH because it can impact FSH levels.

Luteinizing hormone

LH helps regulate your menstrual cycle.

Thyroid-stimulating hormone

TSH is produced by your thyroid gland and regulates thyroid health.

Free thyroxine

Also produced by your thyroid gland, we test FT4 to get the full picture of thyroid function as is relates to fertility.

Prolactin

PRL stimulates milk production and pauses ovulation after you give birth.

Free testosterone

Free T is the amount of testosterone in your body that isn’t yet connected to another hormone.

Total testosterone

Total T is the complete amount of testosterone you have in your body.

  • Anti-mullerian hormone
  • Follicle stimulating hormone
  • Estradiol
  • Luteinizing hormone
  • Thyroid-stimulating hormone
  • Free thyroxine
  • Prolactin
  • Free testosterone
  • Total testosterone

Checking in on hormones

Hormones can help us team up with our doctors to understand egg count, ovulation, general body factors, and red flags that relate to fertility. Let’s tap into the things we can learn from our hormones.

  • IVF and egg freezing

    Fertility doctors measure AMH and FSH + E2 to determine the protocol for Egg freezing and IVF treatments. These hormones help them administer the right amount of hormone medication and help them understand how many eggs they can expect to collect each cycle. Egg count and age are a doctor’s key drivers for predicting outcomes.

    More on egg freezing →

  • Menopause onset

    AMH and FSH can help us understand the likelihood of reaching menopause earlier than average. If we have a lower ovarian reserve than average we could hit menopause earlier than the average age of 51 in the US. It’s important to note, however, the process of starting menopause, called perimenopause, can begin as early as your mid 30s. As we wait longer to have kids, it’s important to understand our menopause window.

  • PCOS

    AMH can play a role in detecting reproductive issues like PCOS–a condition in which the ovaries develop follicles but don't release an egg.

    More on PCOS →

  • Identifying red flags

    FSH and AMH can also screen for red flags that can have implications for fertility. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI), the early loss of ovarian function, affects 1 in 100 women and screening can help your physician identify it earlier in life.

  • Thyroid and general body health

    Together, TSH + FT4 can help you understand the health of your thyroid.

    Thyroid disorders can affect the ability to get (and stay) healthy while pregnant.

The science behind easier testing

How do we make it easy to test fertility hormones? We ran an IRB approved clinical study that demonstrated that the Modern Fertility test and a traditional blood draw can be used interchangeably to measure reproductive hormones in women.

Read the whitepaper →

Meet four of our medical advisors

Robert Luo, M.D.

Dr. Robert Luo, MD, MPH is a board-certified pathologist who has worked on diagnostics over the last 15 years across academia, industry, and public health. Dr. Luo received his BA from Harvard University and his MD and MPH from Johns Hopkins University, before completing his residency training in anatomic and clinical pathology at Stanford University. He has worked at the US Centers for Disease Control, Stanford Medical Center, and most recently at Roche, where he served as a medical director for over 10 new diagnostic assays. His diagnostics work and public health has been published in JAMA, Lancet, and numerous other scientific journals.

Nataki Douglas, M.D.

Dr. Douglas received both her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas was at Columbia University for over 15 years and recently joined Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School as Director of Basic Science Research for the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health. Her research focuses on understanding how the reproductive system develops and what is required for successful embryo implantation and pregnancy. She has a long-standing interest in the practical applications of ovarian reserve testing with reproductive hormones, such as AMH and is nationally known for her work in the field of Reproductive Biology. She has been awarded grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Institutes of Health to support her research.

Sajo Beqaj, PhD

Dr. Sajo Beqaj is board certified in molecular diagnostics and licensed as a Bioanalyst and High Complexity Laboratory Director. He has been practicing as a laboratory director for 13 years. He received his PhD in pathology from Wayne State University Medical School and performed his post-doctoral fellowship at Abbott Laboratories. and continued his career as a Research Assistant Professor at Children’s Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University.

Amber Worthington, PhD

Dr. Amber Worthington is a postdoctoral fellow in Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State. Her research focuses on health communication with a focus on message design and information sharing. Dr. Worthington also teaches research methods and communication theory at Penn State.

Robert Luo, M.D.

Dr. Robert Luo, MD, MPH is a board-certified pathologist who has worked on diagnostics over the last 15 years across academia, industry, and public health. Dr. Luo received his BA from Harvard University and his MD and MPH from Johns Hopkins University, before completing his residency training in anatomic and clinical pathology at Stanford University. He has worked at the US Centers for Disease Control, Stanford Medical Center, and most recently at Roche, where he served as a medical director for over 10 new diagnostic assays. His diagnostics work and public health has been published in JAMA, Lancet, and numerous other scientific journals.

Nataki Douglas, M.D.

Dr. Douglas received both her M.D. and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Douglas was at Columbia University for over 15 years and recently joined Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School as Director of Basic Science Research for the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health. Her research focuses on understanding how the reproductive system develops and what is required for successful embryo implantation and pregnancy. She has a long-standing interest in the practical applications of ovarian reserve testing with reproductive hormones, such as AMH and is nationally known for her work in the field of Reproductive Biology. She has been awarded grants from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the National Institutes of Health to support her research.

Sajo Beqaj, PhD

Dr. Sajo Beqaj is board certified in molecular diagnostics and licensed as a Bioanalyst and High Complexity Laboratory Director. He has been practicing as a laboratory director for 13 years. He received his PhD in pathology from Wayne State University Medical School and performed his post-doctoral fellowship at Abbott Laboratories. and continued his career as a Research Assistant Professor at Children’s Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University.

Amber Worthington, PhD

Dr. Amber Worthington is a postdoctoral fellow in Communication Arts and Sciences at Penn State. Her research focuses on health communication with a focus on message design and information sharing. Dr. Worthington also teaches research methods and communication theory at Penn State.

Hormones are not the whole picture

Fertility is complicated and there's no crystal ball. You can think of hormones as a piece of the fertility puzzle.

Learn more about the fertility puzzle →

Progress over time Progress over time

A number you can track over time

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

When you take the test, you'll get a custom fertility report and a number on the Fertility Measurement Index (beta).

  • More about FEMI BETA

    FEMI numbers sit on a range from 200 to 750 and are made up of three main factors: Age, hormone levels, and information from your health survey. To calculate the number, levels of hormones like AMH and FSH are weighted based on their importance for fertility. Next, important health information you’ve provided like BMI and smoking habits are incorporated. Finally, the index adjusts the number for age. Because natural fertility declines with age, there is a maximum FEMI number for each age range. Every FEMI is reviewed by a physician. The FEMI is in beta.

Backed by science

Physician reviewed reports backed by science

  • Reports are developed and reviewed by physicians
  • Your test is performed in CLIA and CAP accredited laboratory
  • Reports provide you with access to relevant information from peer reviewed studies and medical research
*We can only test for ovulation if you’re not on hormonal contraception. On birth control? No worries! We can still share insight into your fertility.